Latest Posts Under: Artists

Those of you who have been following my blog here know that I hang out in the WetCanvas site periodically, checking out what other artists are producing and using it for inspiration.  The site has forums for just about any media you can imagine and I regularly come across works that make me sit up and “Oh, wow!” Here’s the latest by an “indirect method” (not too clear on that yet) artist named Delmus Phelps: http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=1424348 I especially love the tremendous depth achieved in the first image and suspect it may be even more so… Read Article →

It’s hard for me not to get carried away with superlatives when discussing Marcello Barenghi’s hyper-realistic art — images of soda bottles or candy packages that you’d swear you could pick up, bees ready to fly off the canvas or snakes ready to strike.  While you can see the images at his web site at http://www.marcellobarenghi.com, watching the time-lapse videos of him creating these amazing works on YouTube is the really special treat.  Highly recommended that you check it out!

I’m a member of the Franklin Art Association and every month a guest artist does a demonstration at the group meeting.  Not being a painter and thus knowing little more than there is a brush and paint involved (and canvas?) many of the demos go over my head.  Tonight’s session was different, featuring the lively, vibrant work of Adam O’Day. He did not start with a blank canvas, but instead with a rich orange underpainting.  Wait, I thought this was supposed to be a Boston night scene!  What’s this splash of color doing? Sit back… Read Article →

I’ve always been attracted to realism in painting, struck by the effort and attention to detail required to execute such works.  This style is sometimes referred to as trompe l’œil and was classically executed in bucolic subjects like a violin hanging on a wall or game and gun just brought in from the hunt. The subjects of artist Marcello Barenghi’s hyper-realistic works are distinctly modern, executed in pencil, paint, marker and airbrush instead of the “traditional” oil paints. Particularly fascinating are the time lapse videos of him creating a piece where you can see his media… Read Article →

At the recent Paradise City art show we encountered the inlay work of Matti Laaninen, doing business as Hudson River Inlay (http:/www.hudsonriverinlay.com/). To call his work wonderful is too cliched and insufficient to describe not just the precise craftsmanship but the artistry of his designs.  Some of my images can take 25 to 30 hours or more to edit — a tiny sliver of the weeks.it must take him for some of his larger pieces.. The figured maple glows in the light, simulating water ripples in some of his works, and coupled with numerous other woods (more than… Read Article →

I frequent an artists’ community called WetCanvas, which, despite it’s name, has areas for not just for  painters but pastel artists, photographers and more.  In additional to loads of posts on tips and techniques you can ask questions about the business side of art. But what most attracts me to the site is seeing such a wide variety of art and the talent that is out there.  Here’s an example I stumbled on recently by Keith Murray: http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=1399330 I’ve always been attracted to the realism school and this work certainly has that aspect pegged —… Read Article →

This is a departure from scanography art but worth it — Scott Bennett’s botanical illustrations, particularly of carnivorous plants, are simply delightful.  Sundews, butterworts, Venus’ fly traps, all in stunning detail.  The precise and botanically accurate images of this style have always been of interest to me and his execution is particularly worth checking out! http://fineartamerica.com/featured/venus-fly-trap-scott-bennett.html Now I just need to find some wall space for a print (or three!).

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